Archive - October 2019

‘Tinder’-sollicitatieapp Jobtalk stopt

‘Tinder’-sollicitatieapp Jobtalk stopt


Jobtalk, een mobiele app die it’ers aan een nieuwe baan helpt via Tinderachtige-principes zoals swipen, liken en chatten, stopt. De lage frequentie waarin de app werd gebruikt en het teruglopende aantal gebruikers waren de redenen om de sollicitatieapp uit de lucht te halen.

Jobtalk is in 2015 opgericht en biedt een sollicitatieapp voor de it-arbeidsmarkt. Hierin worden werkzoekenden en vacaturehouders rechtstreeks met elkaar in contact gebracht via swipen, liken en chatten. De onderneemsters maken nu bekend te stoppen met de applicatie.

Ceo Roos Sluis licht in een LinkedIn-post toe dat het vinden van een baan voor velen geen maandelijkse bezigheid is en de frequentie waarmee de app wordt gebruikt door werkzoekenden hierdoor laag bleef. ‘En éénmaal een baan gevonden, dan werd de app vaak verwijderd. Werkgevers bleken nog het meest actief. Vooral de vacatures die moeilijk in te vullen waren, werden graag geplaatst op Jobtalk.’

Sluis laat weten dat Jobtalk een prachtige ervaring was, waarbij waardevolle partnerschappen zijn aangegaan. ‘Misschien was het met een flinke financiële boost een ander verhaal geworden. Maar het is zoals het is’, aldus de ceo in de reactie.

De co-founders blijven wel actief in de (it-)arbeidsmarkt via hun andere bedrijf Perfect Link. Dat bedrijf biedt werving & selectie, headhunting, detachering en interim recruiting in de ict-sector. Ook is de Jobtalk-technologie te koop gezet voor andere bedrijven.

 

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Florida peeping Tom beaten to death by naked man he saw having sex: police

Florida peeping Tom beaten to death by naked man he saw having sex: police

A Florida man was arrested after cops accused him of beating to death a peeping Tom who saw him having sex with his girlfriend through a window.

Victor Vickery’s arrest Thursday for manslaughter concluded a lengthy investigation by Fort Lauderdale police into the July 2018 death of 57-year-old Asaad Akar, according to reports.

In the arrest affidavit Sgt. Steven Novak quoted Vickery as saying that he was in bed with his girlfriend in her house “and they were getting intimate when they heard a scratching on the window and possibly somebody pulling on it.”

Vickery said that the same thing had happened on a previous occasion when he was there, Novak said.

The sergeant wrote that Vickery said he ran outside naked and barefoot, confronted Akar, who had exposed himself, and then kicked and punched him a handful of times as they fought. He said Vickery informed him that he was afraid for his safety during the fight.

Akar died of blunt force trauma.

Novak said in the arrest report that as he was investigating the case he obtained evidence showing that Akar had been “peeping into widows” at different addresses and had a “previous history of arrests for doing the same.”

Novak also stated that several weeks after the girlfriend told cops that she hit Akar with a shovel, she recanted that statement, saying Vickery had told her to say that.

Vickery, 30, of Delray Beach, Florida, was jailed on $100,000 bail.

A month after Akar was killed, a woman accused Vickery of sexually assaulting her, the Florida Sun-Sentinel reported Saturday.

Vickery has been out on bail in that case which is pending.

The paper also reported that Vickery’s rap sheet includes arrests for domestic violence, vehicle theft and unlawful possession of prescription drugs.

This story was originally published by Fox News and is reprinted with permission.

 

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‘The formula of violence is the same everywhere’: Brazilian women face sexual harassment and physical attacks on farms

‘The formula of violence is the same everywhere’: Brazilian women face sexual harassment and physical attacks on farms

Women fruit-pickers in Brazil say they are forced to endure physical, psychological and sexual violence at the hands of farmers. 

The Babassu Coconut Breakers, whose numbers reach over 350,000, make a living collecting the babassu fruit, similar to a coconut. The crop is used in dozens of ways including for food, oils, crafts and beauty.

But the livelihood of these women, whose work protects forests across four states and 25 million hectares, is perpetually under threat from large-scale cattle farmers and ranchers who impede access to trees or charge them for collecting coconuts.

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Their income and traditional way of life are also being endangered by deforestation and forest fires triggered by the development of industrial agriculture for the production of soy, corn, sugar cane and cattle.

The coconut breakers’ land has been occupied for years by cattle ranchers and farmers – who have destroyed great swathes of the forests. Many of these farms belong to global supply chains that produce beef, soy and eucalyptus to be exported to Europe and other regions.

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Eucalyptus plantation in Espirito Santo, Brazil

Simone Lovera

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Women workers occupy a farm owned by Suzano in Bahia after protesting against alleged impact of eucalyptus monoculture in March 2018

MST Communication Group, Bahia

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Women workers occupy a farm owned by Suzano in Bahia after protesting against alleged impact of eucalyptus monoculture in March 2018

MST Communication Group, Bahia

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Women workers occupy a farm owned by Suzano in Bahia after protesting against alleged impact of eucalyptus monoculture in March 2018

MST Communication Group, Bahia

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Pictured: reforestation effort. Simone Lovera told The Independent glyphosate is used to “remove existing vegetation” so new seeds can be planted but the chemical makes an impact on the undergrowth

Simone Lovera

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Members of the Coxi Quilombera community who were surrounded by Fibria’s plantations in 2018

Simone Lovera

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Agro-eco farm cultivated by the Landless Workers’ Movement

Simone Lovera

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Impact of deforestation and land conversion

Simone Lovera

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Simone Lovera told The Independent this land, photographed in September 2018, was once occupied by native Atlantic Forest. She said 92 percent is lost because of conversion to monoculture eucalyptus plantations and other activities like cattle ranching. But the Forest Stewardship Council told The Independent conversion of natural forest to plantation has not been tolerated since 1994.

Simone Lovera

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Eucalyptus plantation in Espirito Santo, Brazil

Simone Lovera

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Women workers occupy a farm owned by Suzano in Bahia after protesting against alleged impact of eucalyptus monoculture in March 2018

MST Communication Group, Bahia

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Women workers occupy a farm owned by Suzano in Bahia after protesting against alleged impact of eucalyptus monoculture in March 2018

MST Communication Group, Bahia

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Women workers occupy a farm owned by Suzano in Bahia after protesting against alleged impact of eucalyptus monoculture in March 2018

MST Communication Group, Bahia

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Pictured: reforestation effort. Simone Lovera told The Independent glyphosate is used to “remove existing vegetation” so new seeds can be planted but the chemical makes an impact on the undergrowth

Simone Lovera

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Members of the Coxi Quilombera community who were surrounded by Fibria’s plantations in 2018

Simone Lovera

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Agro-eco farm cultivated by the Landless Workers’ Movement

Simone Lovera

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Impact of deforestation and land conversion

Simone Lovera

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Simone Lovera told The Independent this land, photographed in September 2018, was once occupied by native Atlantic Forest. She said 92 percent is lost because of conversion to monoculture eucalyptus plantations and other activities like cattle ranching. But the Forest Stewardship Council told The Independent conversion of natural forest to plantation has not been tolerated since 1994.

Simone Lovera

The activists, known as “quebradeiras de coco”, have to deal with routine threats and violence from landowners and armed farm workers – as well as having to battle against sexual harassment, electric fences, fires and the trees being poisoned to carry out their work. 

The unflagged electric fences often lead to women sustaining severe injuries. 

Maria Alaides Alves de Sousa, who is the general coordinator of the Interstate Movement of Babassu Coconut Breakers, tells The Independent farmers sometimes steal the axes that the women use to break coconuts. The farmers also cut their baskets so coconuts fall loose and physically seize the baskets from the women.

She adds: “They also sometimes scare women with horsewhips. I have heard farmers call coconut breakers ‘vagabunda’ which means whore or ask, ‘Don’t you have anything better to be doing?’ or ask their husband, ‘Don’t you take care of your wife?’ or say, ‘If you don’t take care of your wife, I will’.

“In the vast majority of the cases, farmers are men. The farmers themselves are not the ones committing the violence directly. They hire ‘jaguncos’ or ‘pistoleiros’ who are gunmen. The formula of this violence is the same everywhere: they first send a message telling the leader to leave the community, then they try intimidation tactics – such as pretending to run them over, or invading their houses, or throwing the babassu coconut basket after they have collected the coconuts.”

Ms Alves de Sousa explains there were several cases of physical violence at the end of the 1980s and the beginning of the 1990s, when land conflicts were “very intense”.

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“People were evicted from their homes, and their houses and whole communities were burned down,” she adds. “While trying to escape, pregnant women gave birth in the woods. There was one emblematic case in [the state of] Tocantins where one woman coconut breaker was tied to a horse and dragged through the fields. She survived because she could hold the rope and managed to hold her neck, but had severe injuries.” 

She says that conflicts have increased between coconut breakers and farmers since the 1990s because indigenous and traditional communities have increasingly had their rights recognised. 

Coconut breakers produce babassu-derived foods at their cooperative

The number of disputes has also risen because conservation NGOs have had their funds reduced, she adds.

She says: “After the most violent period, after the consolidation of land and tenure legalisation, conflicts and aggression became more ‘sophisticated’ and are now centred on intimidation, threats, property damage – setting fire to crops or houses, killing of animals – and invasions.”

Ms Alves de Sousa notes the coconut breakers also face sexism within their own communities – explaining many do not take part in the movement because husbands commonly say women join in to cheat on their spouses.  

Maria do Rosario Soares Costa Ferreira, the president of the Babassu Coconut Breakers Interstate Cooperative, is being protected by a national programme for people facing death threats. 

The activists strive to protect the Cerrado savannah and the Amazon with their work – and are referred to as the guardians of the babassu forests. They are aiming to broaden the Free Babassu Law, which protects palm trees in private properties and bestows them with access.

A coconut breaker harvests fruit in the forest

But Raimunda Nonata, a coconut breaker from Tocantins, says: “We know the farmers have relations with politicians or even are politicians.” 

Maria Alaides, a 62-year-old who has been a coconut breaker since she was 11, describes the farmers as “sexist, authoritarian and violent”. 

The campaigner hit out at Brazil’s new far-right president Jair Bolsonaro  – saying his election made her worried for the future of the planet. She said the current government was making false statements about NGOs and social movements and “gets in the way” of their livelihoods.

“But even though we have this worry, we will continue our fight for the forest to keep standing,” she adds. “We will keep striving for the good of the environment and our community and that of the rest of the world. This is a women’s led movement because we want to prove women can organise production and market products and stand side by side with men and guarantee their financial autonomy.”

Ms Alves de Sousa says these workers represent a “huge number” of women who are facing “daily threats to their lives and livelihoods”.

She adds: “We want the outside world to understand the impact of trade deals on our communities and support us to protect our forests from deforestation and harmful farming practices that contaminate water supply and poison palm trees.”

Emmanuel Ponte, campaigns adviser for ActionAid Brazil, who supports the coconut breakers, said: “With 80 per cent of global deforestation down to the expansion of agriculture, countries that consume the meat, soy and sugar cane grown in Brazil have a responsibility to create deforestation-free supply chains that protect the rights and livelihoods of indigenous peoples and traditional communities.

“Deforestation and the destruction of the Amazon and Cerrado biomes are sadly nothing new, but we are reaching a point of no return. We are at risk of losing the world’s most important carbon sink and centre of biodiversity. Babassu coconut breakers and other traditional peoples are on the frontline of the fight to save these vital natural resources. In the face of growing threats from the expansion of agribusiness and the reduction of environmental protections, they need support more than ever.”

The Brazilian Ministry of Environment was contacted for comment.

 

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Sex, scandal and death in the White House

Sex, scandal and death in the White House
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President Warren G. Harding, the Chief Executive with matinee idol looks, is best remembered for a corrupt administration and a way with the ladies.

AP Photo

We’re saying “Hail to the Chiefs” on this Presidents’ Day Eve, to some Presidents who are not on anybody’s short list of greats. Mo Rocca reports:

In the rankings of American Presidents, Warren Gamaliel Harding often comes in first . . . from the bottom.

Even though Harding was elected in the biggest landslide up to that point. . . and even though he and his dog Laddie Boy remained immensely popular in office . . . Harding today is remembered (if at all) for his womanizing, and for the scandals that engulfed his administration after he died suddenly in 1923 – poisoned, some believe, by his wife.

But in Warren Harding’s hometown of Marion, Ohio, the favorite son gets more favorable treatment.

Harding home tour guide (or docent) Sherry Hall sees it as her job to set the record straight, or try to.

“He was not poisoned, as you might hear,” Hall told Rocca. “His wife did not kill him. That was a totally made-up story.”

In fact, said Hall, Warren and Florence Harding were very much a team during the 1920 presidential campaign, when the world beat a path to Warren Harding’s doorstep. Literally!

“It was not unusual for 10,000 people to gather before the house,” said Hall.

Hollywood stars came to Marion . . . athletes, too. Al Jolson even wrote a song for the campaign, and played Warren Harding’s porch.

Trella Romine, 95 years young, had a front row seat: “When I was four years old, I shook hands with Harding, right over the banister out there,” she told Rocca. “You want to shake hands with the hand that shook hands with Harding?”

“Wow! Amazing!” he replied.

“I was scared, you know, but when I looked up at his face, it was such a kind face,” said Romine. “So I just stuck out my hand and made history.”

“I’m sorry to go all tabloid on you, but do you think Warren Harding was a womanizer?” Rocca asked.

Romine took the Fifth.

There’s little doubt that Harding was at best negligent in supervising his administration. Several of his appointees, including a cabinet member, went to jail.

But students from Harding High prefer to accentuate the positive.

“His presidential election was the first election that women voted in,” said one girl.

“He was one of the presidents that helped start getting veterans health benefits,” said one boy.

And trivia buffs, take note: President Harding was the only president to be elected on his birthday.

He was always described as being a very natty dresser. Sherry Hall displayed some of Harding’s wardrobe, his golf clubs, his briefcase, his cigars, and even his shoes. The president with matinee idol looks had the biggest feet of any Oval Office occupant.

Among his accomplishments, Harding was the first president to visit Alaska. He died on the way back. Thousands lined the streets to mourn as his body made its way home to Marion, where the town built a monument to him.

When President Harding died, the scandals that would define his presidency hadn’t yet come to light . . . he was still a popular guy. Hence the size of the monument. This thing is big!

A bit grandiose, right? Until you consider that Warren G. Harding was a small town boy who made it to the White House. No matter what, THAT’S a big deal.

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‘Bambi’ killer Jeremy Bamber claims he has found phone call evidence to set him free

‘Bambi’ killer Jeremy Bamber claims he has found phone call evidence to set him free

Jeremy Bamber says he has found phone call evidence that could set him free 33 years after he was locked up for slaughtering his family.  

Bamber, 58, is serving a full life tariff for killing adoptive parents Nevill and June, schizophrenic model sister Sheila ‘Bambi’ Caffell and her twin sons Daniel and Nicholas, aged six, at White House Farm in Essex. 

He says he has unearthed a phone log that proves he did not carry out the August 1985 shootings – and Bamber’s legal team claim a police record referring to a call he made on the night of the massacre proves he was not there at the time, the Mirror reported. 

Jeremy Bamber says he has found phone call evidence that could set him free (pictured: Bamber handcuffed to a police escort in 1988)

It is claimed the record backs up the claim that Bamber’s sister Sheila Caffell, 26, murdered their 61-year-old parents before shooting her own sons and killing herself. 

Jeremy Bamber was convicted of murdering his family to claim a £436,000 inheritance by a 10-2 majority. 

Mark Newby, Bamber’s lawyer, said: ‘The evidence strongly suggests the chain of events could not have been what the prosecution alleged.’

The phonecall record is one part of a large bundle Bamber’s team plan to submit to the Criminal Case Review Commission.   

 The ‘3.37am’ note was found by Bamber among thousands of police documents he gained access to in 2011

Bamber, who is in Wakefield jail, West Yorkshire, says evidence shows he made a call to police from his home at 3.36am on the night of the murder.  

This would have been just 10 minutes after he is thought to have to have called officers from the scene 3.5 miles away.

The new document reportedly describes a call from Jeremy Bamber to police at ‘approx 3.37am’. 

Pictured: Model Sheila ‘Bambi’ Caffell

Lawyers for Bamber now say he could not have called at 3.26am from the farm and travelled to his home in Goldhanger to make the second call.

Mr Newby said: ‘The phone call information is consistent with what Jeremy Bamber always said. It is part of a package of evidence that should lead to a positive review for Jeremy.

‘It’s fair to say when we go back to the CCRC we will have a pretty strong package which we hope they will refer to the Court of Appeal. We hope we will get it across the line.

‘If we do, it is probably this country’s greatest ever miscarriage of justice.’

The ‘3.37am’ note was found by Bamber among thousands of police documents he gained access to in 2011. 

Jurors had been told to disregard Bamber’s claims that he called police from his home at 3.36am, and the prosecution said Bamber had invented the call from Nevill to blame Sheila. 

Last week ITV announced a drama about the murders with Freddie Fox playing Bamber.  

Harrowing: Freddie, left, playing Bamber, then 24, as he recreated the weeping killer’s breakdown at the funeral of his parents, sister and her twin sons in 1985

First-look images from new drama White House Farm showed Freddie, 30, as the spitting image of Bamber, then 24, as he recreated the weeping killer’s breakdown at the funeral of his parents, sister and her twin sons in 1985. 

Bamber says his sister Sheila, who was a diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic, feared having her children taken into care, suffered a psychotic episode and carried out the murders before turning the gun on herself. 

Suspicion turned to Jeremy after the killings.

Jeremy Bamber, with his girlfriend Julie Mugford at the funeral of three members of his family 

The police argued that Bamber must have carried out the murders because the gun had been fitted with a silencer, which made it too long for Sheila to be physically able to shoot herself. 

The prosecution’s case was that, motivated by the prospect of a huge inheritance, had shot his family with his father’s semi-automatic rifle and placed the weapon in his sister’s hands to implicate her.  

Bamber was convicted in 1986 for the murders and has always denied committing the crime. 

For 34 years the case has transfixed Britain as Bamber, now 58, continues to fight to clear his name.

Jeremy Bamber is driven away from court to start his life sentence for the murder of his family

Bamber is one of the few prisoners in the UK who is serving a whole life prison term. He has always denied committing the crime.

When he was convicted by majority verdict at Chelmsford Crown Court on October 28, 1986, he gave little reaction beyond slumping slightly in his seat. 

Sentencing him to five life prison terms, judge Justice Drake said: ‘I find it difficult to foresee whether it will ever be safe to release someone who can shoot two little boys as they lie asleep in their beds.’    

Suspicion first fell on Bamber when scratch marks were found on a kitchen shelf above the Aga, allegedly caused by a silencer fitted to the murder weapon.

The silencer was later found in a gun cupboard, and police deduced it would have been impossible for Mrs Caffell to return it there after shooting herself.

They concluded Bamber carried out the murders after a violent struggle in the kitchen with his father during which the shelf was scratched.  

His ex girlfriend Julie – who he split from one month after the murders – made statements saying Jeremy had told her he hired a hitman to kill his family before saying he had made clear his intentions to end the lives of his family to her on multiple occasions.  

Victim: Essex Police initially believed that Sheila, who had mental health problems, had murdered her own family before turning the gun on herself but the prosecution disagreed

It was argued that the extra length attached onto the rifle meant Caffell would not have been able to turn the gun on herself and then place it in the cupboard.   

The jury was told there was blood on the silencer which came from Caffell and that there was red nail paint on a cupboard, indicating a struggle between herself and the attacker.

Another point of contention was whether Bamber had received a phone call from his father on the night of the murders – in which he alleged Nevill said Sheila had ‘gone berserk’ with a gun.

He said that he alerted police and that Sheila fired a final shot while he spoke to officers outside the house.  

Tragedy: Jeremy’s adoptive parents, Nevill and June Bamber,both aged 61 at the time of their deaths, were also killed in the massacre during the night of 6–7 August 1985

The prosecution argued that Bamber’s father had not made any call and that the only way Bamber would have known about the shootings was because he was the killer. 

However an alleged police log was unearthed in 2010 by Bamber’s defence team, timed at 03.26am, in which Nevill Bamber said his daughter had ‘gone berserk’ and ‘got hold of one of my guns.’ 

Titled ‘Daughter gone berserk’, it said: ‘Mr Bamber … White House Farm … daughter Sheila Bamber aged 26 years has got hold of one of my guns.’

Bamber has also claimed for many years that evidence was not disclosed to the defence by Essex police showing that two silencers had been examined by forensic scientists.   

Prison: Between 2002-2012 Bamber has launched several unsuccessful appeals to prove his innocence (pictured 2013)

The convicted killer has repeatedly challenged the verdict and in 2009 lost a Court of Appeal case against the order that he must die behind bars. 

In 2002 a team of Scotland Yard detectives conducted a fresh investigation, and concluded that blood on the silencer of the gun matched Sheila.

The silencer was found in a downstairs cupboard, and with Sheila’s body found upstairs, police concluded she could not have been the killer.  

In September 2018 the CPS said: ‘We have received correspondence relating to this case and requested additional material in order to respond to the points raised.

‘Jeremy Bamber’s conviction has been the subject of several appeals and reviews by the Criminal Cases Review Commission and there has never been anything to suggest that he was wrongly convicted.’  

 

 

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Mariska Hargitay, the avenging angel of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit”

Mariska Hargitay, the avenging angel of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit”
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The actress and executive producer of the long-running series has taken the fight for victims of sexual harassment and assault off-screen as well.

CBS News

Detective Olivia Benson, of NBC’s “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” is every sexual predator’s worst nightmare. Mariska Hargitay has played Benson, now captain, for a record 21 seasons. 

She showed “CBS This Morning: Saturday” co-host Michelle Miller her show’s interrogation room. “I’ve never even gone in here with a skirt,” she said.

“Olivia Benson, on the force for 21 years. She could be ready for retirement, the pension,” said Miller. “What keeps her going?”

“I think that there is an innate need for justice, to right wrongs, almost to the point of a character flaw,” Hargitay replied.

Her character resonated with viewers from Day One. “It became very apparent to me early on, we needed a compassionate, empathetic figure that would fight for women, fight for survivors, and treat people with the respect they deserved,” she said.

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You have the right to remain silent: Mariska Hargitay with CBS News’ Michelle Miller in the interrogation room set for “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”

CBS News


It is a role Hargitay herself has embraced on-screen, and off-.

Miller asked, “How much has she gotten into you?”

“Are we gonna cry this early?” Hargitay laughed. “No, no, no, no, no, no. Listen … a lot. This show and this character has profoundly changed the trajectory of my life.”

That life began in the spotlight, as the daughter of movie star Jayne Mansfield. Her mother was killed in a gruesome auto accident when Mariska was just three years old, asleep with her two brothers in the back seat.

Miller asked, “Take me through how therapy helped you through that.”

“I think it saved my life,” Hargitay said. “Trauma freezes us. And I think people don’t fully understand how powerful it is.”

“You equated it to PTSD?”

“Oh yeah. Oh yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. I started to grieve my mother’s passing in my mid-20s, like it had happened yesterday. And I went, ‘Oh, okay, so this is still in there.’ And then as I got in therapy, I just kept getting stronger and investing in myself in a new way.”

She was raised by her father, Hungarian-born actor and body-builder Mickey Hargitay. “He just taught me about excellence and never quitting,” she said. “Because he accomplished so much against all odds, and so there was no excuse, ever. He was like, ‘How bad do you want it? I guess you didn’t want it.'”

Mickey Hargitay died in 2006, but lived long enough to see his daughter win the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. “I left the awards show that night, and went to the hospital where my father was, and I gave him the Emmy because I felt like he was the reason that I got it in the first place,” she said.

Her role also inspired her activism: “I started getting letters from survivors disclosing their stories of abuse – that was when I went, ‘Oh,'” Hargitay said.

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Actress Mariska Hargitay (right), with CBS News’ Michelle Miller. 

CBS News


She started Joyful Heart, a foundation to support victims of sexual assault and violence, and produced a documentary exposing the enormous backlog of untested rape kits in this country, “I Am Evidence.” 

Hargitay said, “I think if I was outraged and shocked at the statistics of sexual assault, I thought my head was gonna explode when I learned about hundreds of thousands of untested rape kits, sitting on shelves, being ignored, saying, ‘You don’t matter and what happened to you doesn’t matter.'” 

Last month the HBO film won a News & Documentary Emmy Award for Best Documentary

“SVU” creator Dick Wolf called Hargitay the mother of #MeToo, and said that when the show began in 1999, the subject of sexual harassment and assault was taboo. “Those stories weren’t out there.”

Miller asked him, “Did you ever imagine that this show, and Mariska, would resonate in the way it has for as long as it has?”

“Oh, absolutely!” Wolf laughed. “I knew right away it was going to run for 21 years!”

When Hargitay’s longtime co-star Chris Meloni left the show in 2011, she thought about quitting herself.  “I didn’t want to quit because of fear,” she said. She’s been carrying the show for nine seasons now. 

These days, Hargitay is executive producer, and she also directs. Her husband, Peter Hermann, plays defense attorney Trevor Langan, and now stars in his own show, “Younger.”

Hargitay says she hasn’t directed her husband, “but we work on things together now.”

They met on the set of “SVU.” “I saw him, and I went weak in the knees from minute one,” she laughed.  “Like, ‘Oh wow, okay, wow!'”

They were married in 2004, and now have three children. Miller caught up with them at Citi Field, where Hargitay was throwing out the first pitch for the New York Mets.

Miller said, “Your family unit seems so intact. This is a tough show. You have, like, 10-, 12-hour days sometimes?”

“Do you mean 14-and-a-half every day?” Hargitay laughed.

And yet, here she is back on the set, doing it all and keeping it real. “I love being a work in progress, and I’ve made so much peace with that.”

To watch a trailer for the documentary “I Am Evidence” click on the video player below:


I Am Evidence (2018) Official Trailer | HBO by
HBO on
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Story produced by Mary Lou Teel.

© 2019 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

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Becoming mother has been ‘struggle’, says Meghan

Becoming mother has been ‘struggle’, says Meghan

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Media caption“Not many people have asked if I’m OK,” says Meghan

The Duchess of Sussex has admitted it was a “struggle” becoming a new mother amid intense media scrutiny.

Meghan Markle married Prince Harry at Windsor Castle in May 2018 and gave birth to their son Archie this year.

Speaking in an ITV documentary, the duchess referred to her life under the spotlight “on top of just trying to be a new mom or trying to be a newlywed”.

She added: “Not many people have asked if I’m OK. But it’s a very real thing to be going through behind the scenes.”

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were both interviewed by Tom Bradby during their tour of southern Africa in September.

Asked how she was coping, Meghan said: “Look, any woman – especially when they are pregnant – you’re really vulnerable and so that was made really challenging, and then when you have a new born – you know?

“And especially as a woman, it’s a lot…”

The duchess added: “And also, thank you for asking, because not many people have asked if I’m OK…”

When asked if it would be fair to say it had “really been a struggle”, Meghan said: “Yes.”

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The duke and duchess visited southern Africa last month with their son Archie

The documentary Harry & Meghan: An African Journey airs on ITV on Sunday at 21:00 BST.

Prince Harry described the memories surrounding the death of his mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997 as “a wound that festers”.

On the tour, the prince visited an anti-landmine project championed by his mother in Angola and told ITV it had been “emotional” to trace her footsteps.

“I think being part of this family, in this role, in this job, every single time I see a camera, every single time I hear a click, every single time I see a flash, it takes me straight back, so in that respect it’s the worst reminder of her life, as opposed to the best.”

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Prince Harry visited a landmine project championed by his late mother during the trip

As the tour ended, the duke and duchess both brought legal actions against the press.

Meghan sued the Mail on Sunday over a claim that it unlawfully published one of her private letters.

Harry filed his own proceedings at the High Court against the owners of the Sun, the defunct News of the World, and the Daily Mirror, in relation to alleged phone-hacking.

 

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Corpo de Maurício Sherman será cremado nesta sexta no Rio

Corpo de Maurício Sherman será cremado nesta sexta no Rio

O corpo do ator, produtor, diretor da TV Globo e empresário Maurício Sherman será velado e cremado na sexta-feira (18). Sherman – um dos pioneiros da televisão brasileira – morreu nesta quinta-feira (17), aos 88 anos.

O velório está marcado para ocorrer às 13h no Crematório da Penitência, no Caju, na Zona Norte do Rio.

Morre Maurício Sherman, um dos maiores nomes da televisão brasileira

Morre Maurício Sherman, um dos maiores nomes da televisão brasileira

De acordo com informações da família, Sherman morreu em casa, na Zona Sul do Rio, após ter complicações de saúde causadas por uma doença renal crônica.

Sherman contribuiu para diversas emissoras de TV do país, como a Tupi, a Excelsior, a Bandeirantes e a Manchete – onde lançou as apresentadoras infantis Xuxa e Angélica.

Em várias passagens pela Globo, ajudou a criar o “Fantástico” e dirigiu humorísticos, como “Faça Humor, Não Faça Guerra”, “Os Trapalhões” e os programas de Chico Anysio. Também foi diretor-executivo da Central Globo de Produção.

‘A própria história da televisão’

Também ex-diretor da TV Globo, o empresário José Bonifácio Sobrinho, o Boni, afirmou que a história de Sherman “é a própria história da televisão” brasileira. Sherman – que atuou na área de Entretenimento da Globo – participou de vários programas da emissora e este, inclusive, na inauguração da TV Tupi, no Rio.

“Foi o descobridor da Xuxa e da Angélica. Participou do Fantástico, dirigiu o Faustão e depois criou o ‘Zorra total’. É uma tristeza a perda do nosso Maurício. Uma pessoa carinhosa, amiga e, acima de tudo, um amante da nossa televisão”, contou Boni.

Maurício Sherman e Haroldo Barbosa durante reunião na TV Globo em 1965 — Foto: CEDOC/TV Globo

Trajetória começou no teatro

Sherman nasceu no dia 21 de janeiro de 1931, em Niterói, Região Metropolitana do RJ, filho de um casal de judeus poloneses. Formou-se em direito na Universidade Federal Fluminense no fim dos anos 1940.

Aos 13 anos, porém, já participava de peças amadoras apresentadas em um clube da colônia judaica em Niterói. Em uma dessas ocasiões, foi convidado pelo radialista Hélio Tys para trabalhar como ator na Rádio Mauá, onde estreou em uma representação de “O Corcunda de Notre Dame”.

Maurício Sherman posa para foto com Samantha Schmütz, Miriam Martin e Katiúscia Canoro em dezembro de 2009 — Foto: Rafael França/TV Globo

A partir daí, participou do Grupo Jerusa Camões, no Teatro da Juventude Universitária, atuando em diversos espetáculos ao lado de atores como Gisela Camões, Wanda Lacerda, Nathália Timberg, Fernando Pamplona e Alberto Perez.

Em 1949, foi convidado a trabalhar na Rádio Guanabara, onde conheceu Chico Anysio, Fernanda Montenegro, Jayme Barcellos, Fernando Torres e Elizeth Cardoso.

Em 1951, iniciou sua trajetória na televisão, quando participou de uma representação da Paixão de Cristo na TV Tupi.

Maurício Sherman se transferiu para a TV Paulista, canal 5 de São Paulo, em 1952. Na emissora, representou clássicos do teatro e da literatura, como “Rei Lear” e “Hamlet”, de William Shakespeare, e “Grande Sertão: Veredas”, de Guimarães Rosa.

Em 1954, passou a trabalhar na TV Tupi do Rio de Janeiro, onde permaneceu por dez anos. Durante este período, atuou no “Sítio do Picapau Amarelo” e dirigiu um teleteatro com Heloísa Helena.

Maurício Sherman com Jô Soares no Programa do Jô, da TV Globo — Foto: CEDOC/TV Globo

Depois de uma breve experiência na TV Excelsior, Maurício Sherman foi convidado por Mauro Salles para trabalhar na Globo, em agosto de 1965.

A estreia foi na direção do “Espetáculo Tonelux”, programa apresentado por Marília Pêra, Gracindo Jr., Riva Blanche e Paulo Araújo. O musical era gravado ao vivo no auditório da Globo, com a presença de cantores da Jovem Guarda e uma orquestra sinfônica regida por Isaac Karabtchevsky.

Em 1966, dirigiu os programas humorísticos “Riso Sinal Aberto” e “Bairro Feliz”. Nesse período, contribuiu para a entrada na Globo dos redatores de humor Max Nunes e Haroldo Barbosa.

Maurício Sherman deixou a Globo em 1968, quando o programa que então dirigia, “Noite de Gala”, passou a ser exibido na TV Excelsior. Neste mesmo ano, foi convidado a comandar uma equipe de criação na TV Tupi, composta por Armando Costa, Oduvaldo Vianna Filho e Paulo Pontes.

Permaneceu na Tupi até 1972, quando retornou à Globo para dirigir o humorístico “Faça Humor, Não Faça Guerra”, com Jô Soares, Renato Corte Real, Luis Carlos Miéle, Paulo Silvino e Sandra Bréa.

O diretor participou da equipe de criação do “Fantástico”, em 1973, e foi um dos diretores do programa por três anos. Dirigiu também o “Moacyr Franco Show” até 1977, quando saiu novamente da emissora para assumir a direção artística da linha de shows da TV Tupi de São Paulo. Retornou à Globo em 1981 e dirigiu “Chico Anysio Show” e “Os Trapalhões” por dois anos.

Em 1983, após uma breve passagem pela TV Bandeirantes, Maurício Sherman aceitou o convite de Adolfo Bloch para dirigir a programação da recém-inaugurada TV Manchete. Foi o responsável pela criação do programa “Bar Academia”, da minissérie “Marquesa de Santos” e dos programas infantis apresentados por Xuxa e Angélica, apresentadoras descobertas e lançadas por ele.

Morre aos 88 anos Maurício Sherman

Morre aos 88 anos Maurício Sherman

Maurício Sherman voltou à Globo em 1988, como diretor-executivo da Central Globo de Produção. Nos 12 anos seguintes, desempenhou várias funções: foi diretor de núcleo do horário das 18h; diretor do musical “Globo de Ouro”; diretor artístico do “Fantástico”; diretor do departamento de Projetos Especiais; e diretor da área de controle de qualidade.

De 1989 a 1991, esteve à frente de “Os Trapalhões”, programa apresentado por Renato Aragão, Dedé Santana, Mussum e Zacarias. No dia 28 de julho de 1991, dirigiu o especial comemorativo de 25 anos dos comediantes, com 25 horas de duração e a participação de todo o elenco da Globo.

Em 1991 e 1992, Maurício Sherman dirigiu as vinhetas com a mensagem de final de ano da Globo. Foi premiado pelas vinhetas da mensagem “Tente e invente, faça um 92 diferente”, em que atores, jornalistas, comediantes e apresentadores apareciam mostrando talentos até então desconhecidos do público.

Em 1994, quando atuou como supervisor do “Video Show”, Maurício Sherman foi responsável pela transformação da atração em um programa diário. Em 1999, assumiu o humorístico “Zorra Total”. Em 2001, foi diretor do “Domingão do Faustão”.

Maurício Sherman no comando do programa Faça Humor, Não Faça Guerra — Foto: Acervo / TV Globo

Em 2009, Maurício Sherman dirigiu o especial de fim de ano “Chico e Amigos”. Na trama, que se passava no navio Ventos Anysios, Chico Anysio interpretou personagens que marcaram sua carreira e homenageou a “Escolinha do Professor Raimundo”, que completava 57 anos. Outra edição do especial “Chico e Amigos” foi exibida em janeiro de 2011.

No teatro, Maurício Sherman dirigiu vários espetáculos importantes, com destaque para “A Pequena Notável (1972)”, estrelado por Marília Pêra, no papel de Carmen Miranda; e “Evita” (1983), estrelado pela cantora Cláudia e os atores Mauro Mendonça e Carlos Augusto Strazzer.

Humor

  • Riso Sinal Aberto (1966)
  • Bairro Feliz (1966)
  • Faça Humor, Não Faça Guerra (1973)
  • Chico Anysio Show (1981)
  • Os Trapalhões (1981)
  • Zorra Total (1999)

Auditório & Variedades

  • Noite de Gala (1966)
  • Moacyr Franco Show (1977)
  • Video Show (1994) – supervisor
  • Domingão do Faustão (2001)

Musicais

  • Espetáculos Tonelux (1965)
  • Globo de Ouro (1988)

Jornalismo

 

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